More than 200 dead after 7.1 magnitude earthquake strikes Mexico

At least 217 people are dead after a 7.1 magnitude earthquake rocked central Mexico Tuesday afternoon, hitting on the 32nd anniversary of the biggest earthquake to ever strike the country’s capital.

The earthquake caused extensive damage to Mexico City, leveling at least 44 buildings, including homes, schools and office buildings, according to President Enrique Pena Nieto, who did a flyover of the city Tuesday afternoon.

Among the dead are at least 22 people, including students and at least two adults, from a collapsed primary school in the south of the city. Pena Nieto visited the school late Tuesday. He said those 22 bodies have been recovered, but that 30 children and eight adults are still missing.

Rescuers were clawing at the wreckage looking for survivors late Tuesday, pausing to listen for voices. The Associated Press reported relatives said they had received WhatsApp messages from two girls inside.

Meanwhile, the city’s airport descended into chaos as the ground rippled and chunks of plaster fell from the walls, Dallas resident George Smallwood told ABC News. “I felt the ground shaking, and I heard everyone screaming and starting to run,” he said, adding that at first, he thought he was in the middle of a terror attack.

Smallwood had stopped in Mexico City for a long layover after a vacation in Medellin, Colombia, and had spent the day exploring the capital. He was getting ready to go through security at Mexico City International Airport for his 3:35 p.m. flight back to Dallas when the earthquake hit.

Parts of the ceiling were “swinging back and forth,” he said, and the panicked crowd took off “running in every different direction.”

The tremors lasted for about six to seven minutes, he estimated. Once the shaking subsided, first responders swooped in to help the injured and a fleet of military and police helicopters buzzed overhead, he said.

Breaking News Man Shot 8 Times Inside St Kitts Joseph Nathaniel France Hospital
Breaking News Man Shot 8 Times Inside St Kitts Joseph Nathaniel France Hospital

Smallwood’s flight was rescheduled for 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, so he will need to find somewhere to stay for the night, he said.
FULL STORY MEXICAN EARTHQUAKE

The Latest Happening Right Now Hurricane Maria hits Puerto Rico after slamming Dominica

Hurricane Maria hits Puerto Rico after slamming Dominica
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — One of the strongest hurricanes to ever hit Puerto Rico pummeled the island Wednesday as officials warned it would decimate the power company’s crumbling infrastructure and force the government to rebuild dozens of communities.

Maria made landfall early Wednesday in the southeast coastal town of Yabucoa as a Category 4 storm with winds of 155 mph (250 kph) winds, and it was expected to punish the island with life-threatening winds for 12 to 24 hours, forecasters said.

Maria had previously been a Category 5 storm with 175 mph (281 kph) winds.

“This is going to be an extremely violent phenomenon,” Gov. Ricardo Rossello said. “We have not experienced an event of this magnitude in our modern history.”

Metal roofs were already flying and windows were breaking as the storm approached before dawn, with nearly 900,000 people without power and one tree falling on an ambulance. Those who sought shelter at a coliseum in San Juan were moved to the building’s second and third floors, reported radio station WKAQ 580 AM. The storm was moving across Puerto Rico on Wednesday morning at 10 mph (17 kph), with a gust of 113 mph (182 kph) reported in the capital of San Juan, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Maria ties for the eighth strongest storm in Atlantic history, when measured by wind speed. Coming in second is this year’s Irma, which had 185 mph (300 kph) winds and killed 38 people in the Caribbean and another 36 in the U.S. earlier this month.

Puerto Rico had long been spared from a direct hit by hurricanes that tend to veer north or south of the island. The last Category 4 hurricane landfall in Puerto Rico occurred in 1932, and the strongest storm to ever hit the island was San Felipe in 1928 with winds of 160 mph.

As Maria approached, U.S. President Donald Trump offered his support via Twitter: “Puerto Rico being hit hard by new monster Hurricane. Be careful, our hearts are with you- will be there to help!”

More than 4,400 people were in shelters by late Tuesday, along with 105 pets, Rossello said.

The storm’s center passed near or over St. Croix overnight Tuesday, prompting U.S. Virgin Islands Gov. Kenneth Mapp to insist that people remain alert. St. Croix was largely spared the widespread damage caused by Hurricane Irma on the chain’s St. Thomas and St. John islands just two weeks ago. But this time, the island would experience five hours of hurricane force winds, Mapp said.

“For folks in their homes, I really recommend that you not be in any kind of sleepwear,” he said during a brief news conference. “Make sure you have your shoes on. Make sure you have a jacket around. Something for your head in case your roof should breach. … I don’t really recommend you be sleeping from 11 o’clock to 4 (a.m.). … Be aware of what’s going on around you.”

Maria killed one person in the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe when a tree fell on them Tuesday, and two people aboard a boat were reported missing off La Desirade island, just east of Guadeloupe, officials said.

About 40 percent of the island — 80,000 homes — were without power and flooding was reported in several communities.

The storm also blew over the tiny eastern Caribbean island of Dominica late Monday, where Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit sent out a series of dramatic posts on his Facebook page, including that his own roof had blown away.source yahoo news via reuter

“The winds are merciless! We shall survive by the grace of God,” Skerrit wrote before communications went down.

The storm knocked out communications for the entire island, leaving anyone outside Dominica struggling to determine the extent of damage, though it was clearly widespread. “The situation is really grave,” Consul General Barbara Dailey said in a telephone interview from New York.

She said she lost contact with the island about 4 a.m. At that point, officials had learned that 70 percent of homes had lost their roofs, including her own.

Flooding was a big concern, given the island’s steep mountains, cut through with rivers that rage even after a heavy rain. Dominica was still recovering from Tropical Storm Erika, which killed 30 people and destroyed more than 370 homes in August 2015.

Forecasters said the storm surge from Maria could raise water levels by 6 to 9 feet (1.8 to 2.7 meters) near the storm’s center. The storm was predicted to bring 10 to 15 inches (25 to 38 centimeters) of rain across the islands, with more in isolated areas.

To the north, Hurricane Jose weakened to a tropical storm Tuesday night. Forecasters said dangerous surf and rip currents were likely to continue along the U.S. East Coast but said the storm was unlikely to make landfall. Big waves caused by Jose swept five people off a coastal jetty in Rhode Island and they were hospitalized after being rescued.

A tropical storm warning was posted for coastal areas in Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and tropical storm watches were up for parts of New York’s Long Island and Connecticut.

___

Associated Press writers Ben Fox in Miami and Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.

Hurricane Maria back at Category 5 as it barrels toward Puerto Rico CNN

(CNN)Hurricane Maria, making its first landfall as a Category 5 storm, has blasted Dominica with “widespread devastation,” according to the prime minister of the Caribbean island nation.

With the US territory of Puerto Rico and the US and British Virgin Islands now in its path, Maria’s powerful punch diminished slightly to Category 4 after it hit Dominica Monday night, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
But the NHC said Tuesday morning after an Air Force “Hurricane Hunter” aircraft flew into the storm, Maria had reintensified to Category 5 status, with estimated maximum sustained winds of 160 mph. It was moving west-northwest at 9 mph, with that track expected to continue through Wednesday.
“On the forecast track, the eye of Maria will move over the northeastern Caribbean Sea today, and approach the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico tonight and Wednesday,” the NHC said in its overnight updates, adding that it would be “an extremely dangerous category 4 or 5 hurricane” as it bears down on the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.
Hurricane-force winds extended up to 30 miles (45 km) outward from the center of the storm, and tropical-storm-force winds extended up to 125 miles (205 km) from the center, the NHC said.
On Dominica, authorities were waiting for daylight to assess the damages from Hurricane Maria to the island nation of more than 73,000 people.
“Initial reports are of widespread devastation,” Dominica Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit said on Facebook. “So far we have lost all what money can buy and replace. My greatest fear for the morning is that we will wake to news of serious physical injury and possible deaths as a result of likely landslides triggered by persistent rains.”
The former French and British colony — an independent nation since 1978 — has an economy heavily dependent on tourism and agriculture, industries that would be extremely vulnerable to the ravages of a hurricane.
Hurricane Maria is the strongest storm on record to make landfall in Dominica, and it would be the first Category 4 or greater hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in 85 years.
Puerto Rico’s governor, Ricardo Rosselló, has declared a state of emergency ahead of that landfall, which will likely happen Wednesday.
Hurricane Maria track
A hurricane warning from the NHC remains in effect for Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis, Montserrat, the US and British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Culebra, and Vieques.
The regional government of Guadeloupe tweeted early Tuesday to its residents: “Don’t go out under any circumstances.”
US President Donald Trump issued an emergency declaration for Puerto Rico for federal assistance to augment the territory’s storm-response initiatives.
The ferocity of Maria bears striking similarities to Hurricane Andrew, the Category 5 hurricane that hit the Bahamas and Florida in 1992, says CNN meterologist Pedram Javaheri. Both storms are compact, and Maria’s wind speed comes close to that of Hurricane Andrew — 165 mph — when it hit southern Florida.

Puerto Rico on alert

Puerto Rico sheltered many of the evacuees who fled Hurricane Irma’s wrath in other Caribbean islands. Now those evacuees and native Puerto Ricans are bracing for another powerful hurricane.
Rosselló ordered evacuations ahead of deteriorating conditions, telling CNN that extensive preparations had been made to mitigate Maria’s potential impact.
“We’re as ready as we can be,” he told CNN’s Don Lemon.
“This sort of event is a very dangerous event, high winds … and a lot of rainfall. And this coming just about two weeks after Irma skirted off the northeast of Puerto Rico.
“We’ve made preparations… we’ve focused on really the only thing that matters right now, which is making sure people are safe. We have 500 shelters, (we’re) moving people to those shelters and hopefully weathering the storm so we can rebuild Puerto Rico.
Calling its potential impact “catastrophic,” Rosselló said the island was expected to experience tropical storm force winds for about two and a half days and sustained high level hurricane winds for “the better part of a day.”
“We expect to feel storm winds, tropical storm winds, since Tuesday up until late on Thursday. That’s about two-and-a-half days of tropical storm winds, and on Wednesday we will feel the brunt — all of the island will feel the brunt of sustained category four or five winds, Rosselló said.
“This is an event that will be damaging to the infrastructure, that will be catastrophic, and our main focus — our only focus right now — should be to make sure we save lives.”
If Maria strikes the island as forecast, it will be “more dangerous than Hugo and Georges,” he said.
Hurricane Hugo killed five people in Puerto Rico in 1989, and Hurricane Georges caused more than $1.7 billion in damage to the island in 1998.
In Salinas, a city on the island’s southern coast where the storm is expected to hit hard, CNN saw dozens of people queuing for water and essentials ahead of the hurricane’s anticipated impact.
Restauranteur Juan Miguel Gonzalez told CNN he was “worried” about the storm’s impact. “Not about material stuff, rather the people,” he said.
His staff were working to prepare the waterfront property for Maria’s arrival and the 39-year-old said that he would return tomorrow to make sure that it was secure.
Staff were working to secure restauranteur Juan Miguel Gonzalez' property ahead of the storm late Monday.

The Puerto Rico Convention Center in the capital San Juan to the north, which is still housing Hurricane Irma evacuees from other Caribbean islands, is preparing to accept thousands of residents as the brunt of the storm is felt.

Rapid intensification

Maria went from a tropical storm to a Category 5 — the highest level on the scale used by meteorologists — in just 30 hours. Its top winds were at 65 mph at 2 p.m. on Sunday but had exploded to the Category 5 status of 160 mph by 8 p.m. on Monday, according to the NHC.
Trump issued an emergency declaration for the US Virgin Islands.
There are tropical storm warnings in effect for Martinique, Antigua and Barbuda, Saba and St. Eustatius, St. Martin, Anguilla and St. Lucia.
The Dominican Republic government has issued a hurricane watch from Isla Saona to Puerto Plata, and a tropical storm watch west of Puerto Plata to the northern Dominican Republic-Haiti border.
The British Foreign Office said more than 1,300 troops are in the region, on affected islands or nearby locations, ready to help after Maria goes by. One military team has been deployed to the British Virgin Islands.
A British military reconnaissance team is on standby to go to Montserrat and assess needs, the office said. The HMS Ocean is set to arrive in the area at week’s end with 60 tons of government supplies.
Another hurricane, Jose, is also churning in the Atlantic and has spawned tropical storm warnings for part of the US East Coast.
While forecasters don’t anticipate Jose making landfall in the US, it’s still expected to cause “dangerous surf and rip currents” along the East Coast in the next few days, the hurricane center said.

‘Evacuate or die’: Puerto Ricans are told to abandon their homes and a curfew is imposed in the British Virgin Islands as 160mph Hurricane Maria smashes Dominica and the Caribbean Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4898010/Dominica-PM-rescued-home-Hurricane-Maria-hits.html#ixzz4t7dfsGc5 Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Puerto Ricans have been told to ‘evacuate or die’ after Hurricane Maria laid waste to the island of Dominica on its destructive path across the Caribbean.
Islanders have been warned to find shelter immediately with the howling 160mph winds expected to ‘devastate’ most of the U.S. territory tomorrow.
Frantic attempts are also being made to prepare for the storm before it slams into the British Virgin Islands where a curfew has been put in place.
It comes as experts revealed Maria has developed a ‘pinhole eye’ producing a more compact centre and intensifying its power.
Overnight, the storm caused chaos on Dominica and destroyed the house of prime minister Roosevelt Skerrit who had to be rescued. The 44-year-old, who has led the country since 2004, said he was at the ‘complete mercy of the hurricane’ before announcing that he had made it to safety.
But he later warned Dominica has lost ‘all what money can buy’ adding on Facebook: ‘My greatest fear for the morning is that we will wake to news of serious physical injury and possible deaths as a result of likely landslides triggered by persistent rains.’

Unconfirmed reports have suggested that Dominica’s main hospital has had its roof torn off, leaving patients vulnerable to the hurricane and local residents without access to medical care.
Power has gone down across the majority of Dominica. The DBS radio station has stopped broadcasting on the island after reports that the building had been smashed by falling objects in 160mph winds.
Meanwhile, emergency steps are being undertaken on the British Virgin Islands to prepare for the looming onslaught, although an official co-ordinating the operation has warned the islands had been ‘weakened’ by Irma and the situation ‘doesn’t look good’.
A curfew is in place and the governor Gus Jaspert warned of a race against time to clear up Irma debris to stop it becoming ‘missiles’ when Maria hits.

Another British overseas territory, Montserrat, has been issued with a hurricane warning amid fears Maria could bring a devastating storm surge, while torrential rain could trigger deadly flash floods.
UK International Development Secretary Priti Patel said the Government is under no illusion about the possible impact of the strengthening hurricane and said they were taking steps to prepare communities.
Forecasters warned it was likely to grow even stronger as it entered warmer waters. It’s still too early to know whether Maria poses any threat to the U.S.
The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the storm would likely intensify over the next 24 hours or longer, noting its eye had shrunk to a compact 10 miles across and warning: ‘Maria is developing the dreaded pinhole eye.’


That generally means an extremely strong hurricane will get even mightier, said Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher at the University of Miami. He said it just like when a spinning ice skater brings in their arms and rotates faster. ‘You just don’t see those in weaker hurricanes,’ he said.
Authorities in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico warned that people in wooden or flimsy homes should find safe shelter before the storm’s expected arrival there on Wednesday.
‘You have to evacuate. Otherwise, you’re going to die,’ said Hector Pesquera, the island’s public safety commissioner. ‘I don’t know how to make this any clearer.’
Puerto Rico’s governor, Ricardo Rosselló, meanwhile warned the hurricane will have a much greater impact than Irma.
‘It will essentially devastate most of the island,’ he told USA Today adding: ‘It will provoke massive flooding in flooding prone regions … our priority is to save lives.’
Officials in Guadeloupe said the French island near Dominica probably would experience heavy flooding and warned that many communities could be submerged.

Read More At The Daily Mail

New Photos Dominica PM reveals catastrophic destruction before he is rescued from his home as 160mph Hurricane Maria hits Caribbean island

‘We’ve lost all that money can buy’: Dominica PM reveals catastrophic destruction before he is rescued from his home as 160mph Hurricane Maria hits Caribbean island

 Dominica PM reveals catastrophic destruction before he is rescued from his home as 160mph Hurricane Maria hits Caribbean island
Dominica PM reveals catastrophic destruction before he is rescued from his home as 160mph Hurricane Maria hits Caribbean island

Hurricane Maria has unleashed its fury on the Caribbean island of Dominica, destroying the Prime Minister’s residence and forcing him to be rescued.
Roosevelt Skerrit, who has led the country since 2004, updated his citizens on Facebook as the hurricane ripped the roof from his home.
The 44-year-old said he was at the ‘complete mercy of the hurricane’ before announcing that he had been rescued.
But he later warned Dominica has lost ‘all what money can buy’ after Maria intensified into a ‘potentially catastrophic’ category five storm moving towards British overseas territories already battered by Irma.
Warning of ‘widespread devastation’, he wrote overnight: ‘My greatest fear for the morning is that we will wake to news of serious physical injury and possible deaths as a result of likely landslides triggered by persistent rains.’
Unconfirmed reports have suggested that Dominica’s main hospital has had its roof torn off, leaving patients vulnerable to the hurricane and local residents without access to medical care.
Power has gone down across the majority of Dominica. The DBS radio station has stopped broadcasting on the island after reports that the building had been smashed by falling objects in 160mph winds.
Forecasters warned it was likely to grow even stronger as it entered warmer waters. It’s still too early to know whether Maria poses any threat to the U.S.
The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the storm would likely intensify over the next 24 hours or longer, noting its eye had shrunk to a compact 10 miles across and warning: ‘Maria is developing the dreaded pinhole eye.’

That generally means an extremely strong hurricane will get even mightier, said Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher at the University of Miami. He said it just like when a spinning ice skater brings in their arms and rotates faster. ‘You just don’t see those in weaker hurricanes,’ he said.
Skerrit, writing on Facebook said: ‘Certainly no sleep for anyone in Dominica. I believe my residence may have sustained some damage,’ he wrote at first.
He added: ‘We do not know what is happening outside. We do not dare look out. All we hear is the sound of galvanise (galvanised iron roofing) flying. The sound of the fury of the wind. As we pray for its end!’
An hour later, the Prime Minister posted dramatically: ‘Rough! Rough! Rough!’ He then added, ‘my roof is gone. I am at the complete mercy of the hurricane. House is flooding.’
As Dominican citizens and others around the world looked on, a few minutes later he concluded: ‘I have been rescued,’ before explaining that the loss of his roof ‘triggered an avalanche of torn away roofs in the city and the countryside’.

The Prime Minister then appealed to ‘friendly nations and organisations with helicopter services’ for help.
In referring to the galvanised iron roofs, Mr Skerrit was identifying one of the worst hazards in a long list of dangers facing islanders.
Flung into the air by hurricane-force winds, the tin sheeting becomes in effect flying blades.
A woman from the island of Barbuda, told MailOnline last night that she had seen a horse cut in half by a sheet of the roofing when the island was flattened by Hurricane Irma.
Hurricane Maria started as a tropical storm last week but steadily gained power as it approached the Caribbean islands.
Last night it was finally upgraded to Category Five status; Hurricane Irma, which left a trail of destruction across the region 10 days ago, was assessed as ‘Category Five Plus’.
Dominica lies directly in the path of the furious weather system, with its mountainous terrain and tendency to rain raising fears of mud slides.
The island last suffered serious weather damage during Tropical Storm Erica in 2015, which dumped 33-inches of rain, triggering widespread mudslides.
The entire town of Petite Savanne had to be evacuated and 30 people were killed.
It is thought that Dominica has not seen such severe weather since Hurricane David, a Category Five storm, killed more than 2,000 people on the island in 1979. In 1930, Hurricane San Zenon also left thousands of Dominicans dead.

Heavy wind and rain continues to lash a number of islands in the Caribbean, with particular fears for Guadeloupe and Puerto Rico as well as Dominica.
Barbuda and St Martin, both of which suffered the brunt of Hurricane Irma and were almost totally destroyed, are also suffering the onslaught of Maria tonight.
Even though they do not lie directly in the path of the storm, the mountains of debris lying in the streets and the thousands of ruined buildings on the islands make the level of danger severe.
Barbuda is understood to have been entirely evacuated yesterday for the first time in about 300 years, with many residents taken to nearby Antigua. The island is now guarded by Royal Marines.
The storm is currently on a path that will take it near many of the islands already wrecked by Hurricane Irma and then on toward Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.
Maria could hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday, said Ernesto Morales with the U.S. National Weather Service in San Juan.
‘This storm promises to be catastrophic for our island,’ he said. ‘All of Puerto Rico will experience hurricane force winds.’
The U.S. territory on Monday imposed rationing of basic supplies including water, milk, baby formula, canned foods, batteries, flashlights and other items.
The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Maria had maximum sustained winds of 130 mph Monday afternoon, and called the storm ‘extremely dangerous’.

Hurricane warnings were posted for the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat, Martinique and St. Lucia. A tropical storm warning was issued for Antigua and Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten and Anguilla.
Forecasters warned yesterday of storm surge raising water levels by 6 to 9 feet near the storm’s center. The storm was predicted to bring 6 to 12 inches of rain across the islands, with more in isolated areas.
Officials in Dominica closed schools and government offices on Monday and urged people to evacuate and seek shelters.
Officials in Guadeloupe said the French Caribbean island would experience extremely heavy flooding starting Monday afternoon, and they warned that many communities would be submerged overnight.
In nearby Martinique, authorities ordered people to remain indoors and said they should be prepared for power cuts and disruption in the water supply. All schools and non-essential public services were closed.
On Wednesday, Maria was expected to be near or over Puerto Rico, which was spared the full brunt of Irma, although much of the island had its power knocked out.
Nearly 70,000 people remain without power, and Gov. Ricardo Rossello on Monday warned of another widespread outage.

‘We have an extremely weak infrastructure that has already been hit by one storm,’ he said. ‘This is going to be a catastrophic event.’
Forecasters said the storm would dump up to 18 inches of rain across Puerto Rico and whip the U.S. territory with heavy winds for 12 to 24 hours.
Officials said the Federal Emergency Management Agency was ready to bring drinking water and help restore power in Puerto Rico immediately after the storm.
Rossello said officials had prepared about 450 shelters with a capacity for nearly 68,000 people – or even 125,000 in an emergency. There are still nearly 200 people in shelters from Hurricane Irma. Schools were cancelled for Monday and government employees would work only a half day.
Officials in the Dominican Republic urged people to leave areas prone to flooding and said fishermen should remain in port.
Farther north, long-lived Hurricane Jose continued to head northward off the U.S. East Coast, causing dangerous surf and rip currents. It wasn’t expected to make landfall but tropical storm watches were posted along the coast from Delaware to Massachusetts’ Cape Cod.
Jose was centered about 265 miles east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and was moving north at 9 mph. It had maximum sustained winds of 75 mph.
The ocean washed over parts of North Carolina’s Outer Banks as Hurricane Jose passed well to the east, and five people were knocked off a coastal jetty in Rhode Island by high surf caused by the storm.
Officials said rescuers had to fight through rough surf to load the injured onto stretchers and get them to shore. All five were taken to a hospital with minor and major injuries.
In the Pacific, Tropical Storm Norma’s threat to Mexico’s Los Cabos resort area at the southern end of the Baja California Peninsula seemed to ease as forecasters said the storm’s center was likely to remain offshore.
Norma had winds of about 50 mph and it was centered about 175 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas. The Baja California Sur state government prepared storm shelters and canceled classes for Monday.
Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Lee weakened into a tropical depression far out in the Atlantic while Hurricane Otis weakened far out in the Pacific. Neither threatened land.
Read More At The Daily Mail

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4898010/Dominica-PM-rescued-home-Hurricane-Maria-hits.html#ixzz4t6sOGLkr
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook